Political Science Department Courses

  

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Political Science Courses

POSC 100 F American Government (3)
Three hours lecture and discussion per week. This course is an
introductory survey of American governing institutions, federal and state,
and other elements of the political system. The course is issue-oriented,
inviting students to analyze critically competing theories and arguments
relating to the founding of the Republic (especially the development of
the Constitution), federalism, individual rights and liberties, interest
groups, political parties, voting behavior and elections, campaign finance
reform, public policy options, and the operational relations among the
executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Course curriculum recognizes
the roles and contributions of racial and ethnic groups and women
in American politics. On each of these topics comparisons will be made
to the governing units and politics of California, as well as local government.
(CSU) (UC Credit Limitation) (Degree credit)

POSC 100HF Honors American Government (3)
Three hours lecture and discussion per week. Enhanced for honors
students. This course is an introductory survey of American governing
institutions, federal and state, and other elements of the political system.
The course is issue-oriented, inviting students to analyze critically competing
theories and arguments relating to the founding of the Republic
(especially the development of the Constitution), federalism, individual
rights and liberties, interest groups, political parties, voting behavior and
elections, campaign finance reform, public policy options, and the operational
relations among the executive, legislative, and judicial branches.
Course curriculum recognizes the roles and contributions of racial and
ethnic groups and women in American politics. On each of these topics
comparisons will be made to the governing units and politics of California,
as well as local government.
(CSU) (UC Credit Limitation) (Degree credit)
                        more information about the honors program

POSC 110 F Contemporary American Politics (3)
Three hours lecture and discussion per week. This course emphasizes
the political problems that are current in the American political
scene and provides an opportunity for the student to investigate and
evaluate contending response to those problems. Alternately, this course
is designed to provide structured opportunities for students to participate
actively in the processes of government and politics as interns.
(CSU) (UC) (Degree credit)

POSC 120 F Introduction to Political Theory (3)
Three hours lecture and discussion per week. The course is a survey
of Western political theory. It is intended to introduce students to
political theory from Greek times to the Enlightenment and beyond. It is
intended to show students how political theory shapes current institutions
and ideologies in the United States, Europe, and other countries
around the world.
(CSU) (UC) (Degree credit)

POSC 150 F California Government & Politics (3)
Three hours lecture and discussion per week This course is an
introduction to the study of state and local politics, exploring the political
culture, processes, behavior, institutions, public policy, and distribution of
power in California. Policies in other states are examined to aid understanding
of California politics. Topics include the political culture of the
state, the process of change, policy agendas, budgeting, and the current
status of states within the federal system.
(CSU) (Degree credit)

POSC 180 F Capital Field Trip: Sacramento Seminar (3)
This seminar class joins with student delegations from other California
colleges and universities that meet in the state capitol for a four-day
policy conference each spring. Includes presentations and panel discussions
by legislators, lobbyists, public administrators, and journalists. The
class will meet regularly before the practicum to prepare students for the
conference and an independent research paper will be assigned.
(CSU) (Degree Credit)

POSC 200 F Introduction to the Study of Politics (3)
Three hours lecture and discussion per week. This course is an
introduction to the study of politics in general, not simply American politics.
Explore the many faces of politics all over the world, examining its
relationships to morality, culture, economics, justice and international
affairs both theoretically and practically. As an introductory course, it
includes elements from the major sub-disciplines of political science, i.e.,
American politics, comparative politics, and international relations.
(CSU) (UC) (Degree credit)

POSC 215 F Comparative Political Systems (3)
Three hours lecture and discussion per week. This course emphasizes
various methodologies necessary to compare political systems
representing Eurasia, the Western Hemisphere, and the developing
nations. It explores the differences and similarities in the operation of the
major branches of government, political party and electoral systems,
types and activities of interest groups, individual rights and liberties,
leadership patterns, the power relations among local, provincial, national
and supra-national regional governments such as the European Community,
and the challenges facing transitional democracies throughout
the world.
(CSU) (UC) (Degree credit)

POSC 216 F Government and Politics in the Middle East (3)
Three hours lecture and discussion per week. This course is an
introduction to the historical, social, economic and ideological foundations
of the Middle East in general and major states in the region in particular.
Emphasis is placed on the political and economic developments
in Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Israel and Saudi Arabia. Topics covered include:
introduction to the land, peoples, cultures and religions; colonialism and
the emergence of modern states following World War I; Western influence
and Islamic revivalism; regional conflicts (Arab-Israeli, Iran-Iraq,
Gulf War); the politics and economics of oil; U.S. based ethnic interest
groups and their influence on U.S. foreign policy; patrimonialism and militarism;
liberalization and democratization.
(CSU) (UC) (Degree)

POSC 230 F Introduction to International Relations (3)
Three hours lecture and discussion per week. This course is a study
of the basic dynamics and structure of the nation-state system as it
emerged in the post-World War II context, and in the aftermath of the
collapse of the Soviet Bloc. Students will examine major issues of the
U.S. foreign policy, and engage in an individual research project.
(CSU) (UC) (Degree credit)

POSC 275 F Introduction to Public Law (3)
Three hours lecture and discussion per week. The course explores
the interactive dynamic among the judicial, legislative, and executive
branches in the creation and implementation of public law. It involves an
extensive analysis of cases relating to the separation of powers, federal
and state relations, and rights of property, free expression, privacy, criminal
due process, political participation, and equality under the law. Corollary
topics include orientation to legal research, case briefing, development
of judicial review, judicial organization and decision-making, sources and
limits of judicial power, and the political impact of Supreme Court decisions.
Students will participate in various simulations of court decisions.
(CSU) (UC) (Degree credit)

POSC 299 F Political Science Independent Study (1-1-1)
One hour lecture or scheduled conference per week. This course is
offered for students who wish to increase their knowledge of the Social
Sciences through individual study and small group conferences. Students
successfully completing this course will be awarded elective credit
in the Social Sciences area. Course may be taken three times for credit.
(CSU) (UC review required) (Degree credit)


 

 

 
 

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